Vignettes: Neurologist Check up and Sixth Sympathetic Nerve Block and Ballet

It’s funny (not really), how all of this has become normal for me. Traveling a thousand miles to see my doctors. Having a large needle threaded through my spine.  No big deal… Except, it is a big deal. Except, I can’t complain because it is what I have to keep doing at this time.

My neurologist check up went… well… like they usually do… I was in extreme pain from my trip. My leg was having a full-blown dystonic meltdown like a tired, hungry, spoiled, obstinate 3 year-old child amid temper tantrum hysteria. The neurologist didn’t like that very much.

He wrote a new prescription, increasing my dosage of Lyrica. He noticed significant visible atrophy in my right lower leg. He measured around both of my calves. My left was just over 13″. I couldn’t bear to look at the measurement of the right. He told me to keep swimming. He said wanted to see me again in another three months. Awesome.

And the nerve block. All of my favorite and familiar fellows from Columbia’s Pain Medicine program moved on over the summer. I was at the mercy of a new crop of fellows. The sympathetic block procedure went very well. Under the tutelage of my beloved doctor, the unfamiliar new guy performed beautifully. Another one for the hall of fame.

But getting to this point was a bit of a struggle. The appointments happen in three phases. The third is the procedure itself. The first: Check-In and vitals taking. Everything normal. Fine. The second: IV connected to a bag of saline solution (you know, just in case…). This is where there was a bit of… uh… a hiccup. A big bloody hiccup.

By this point, I have zero fear of needles. I don’t really care about seeing my blood. I don’t like it, but I’m not squeamish that way. Or at least I didn’t think I was. I was ready. The new guy asked me to show him my hands so he could see my veins. I raised my eyebrow because, like, the veins in my arms bulge and don’t need close inspection. I told the doctor, (‘he’s new,’ I told myself, ‘I’ll go easy on him’) about my deal with his predecessors about using my elbow vein.

I don’t think he was expecting a special request. I inadvertently threw him off his game.  He struggled getting the bag openedish and left the room with the bag, tubes, and pole. Uhhm? Hello? Goodbye? A couple minutes later, he returned. I saw through his thin veneer of feigned confidence. I sat still, still confident that everything would be fine.

He placed a paper towel underneath my elbow. Whatthefuck? I decided to force my attention away from the obvious intrusive premonition.

‘Whatever,’ I quietly consoled myself, ‘maybe it’s just his thing.’

Nope. Not just his thing. This guy had no clue how to start an IV. The “little pinch” somehow resulted in a massive leak from my vein. The flimsy paper towel was useless. Blood poured out of my elbow. I stayed still and quiet and breathed as calmly as possible. If I freaked out like I wanted to, I knew he’d become even more rattled. He gained control. I felt lightheaded. After he cleaned most of my arm (wiping, wiping, wiping), he couldn’t figure out how to open the IV to allow the saline to enter my bloodstream. Instead, what was left of my blood traveled up the tube.

An angel, in the form of the technician, entered the room to help me into the procedure room. She looked at my curiously bloody elbow. She called my doctor over. “There seems to be a lot of blood backing up in the tube.”

I couldn’t hold myself back any longer. “I think that if someone would just open the IV, the flow of the saline would push the blood back into my body.”

“The IV isn’t opened?! Oh! Of course. There. Is that better? That’s better.”

I prayed to baby Jesus, Buddha, and Benny Goodman, “Please, please, God, don’t let that guy be the guy threading a needle through my spine. Pretty please?”

He wasn’t. He left the room. Halle-fucking-lujah.

The doctor who performed the procedure was incredible. And that is really all that matters. It’s funny (not really) how I don’t care if I almost bled to death, so long as my leg is warm, stops hurting, and shaking for a few days.

The bright spot in my trip was, of course, a ballet class. The teacher I’ve been taking from, Kat, was out of town. I looked at the various schedules of the various studios. Another one of my favorite teachers, and friend, Jamie Salmon, was teaching a beginning ballet class at Broadway Dance Center. (Her class was the last class I had taken before my accident. Peridance. June 13, 2014. It was a Friday.)

I went to the barre. I stretched. Into the room slumped my all-time favorite accompanist. Vladimir. He has been playing for classes, around The City, as long as I can remember taking classes in The City. At least 20 years. I smiled and cried a little bit. I get so nostalgic.

The class was crowded. Jamie didn’t see me. Halfway through barre she approached me. “Pull up even more with your standing side,” she rubbed the back of her fingers along my oblique abs. I was standing on my left foot. I was able to make the correction. “Good girl.” She smiled and moved on.

But centre was, as it is now, a struggle for me. I am getting better at merging what I can do with what I can’t. But everyone was messing up the timing of one combination. I wasn’t the only one struggling. She stopped the class and said, “It’s not that it was not musical… but it certainly wasn’t what I’d call musical.” Most of the class snickered quietly. I guffawed.

In a half-whisper half-exclamation, if that’s possible, “Jenn!” She was beaming. “I’m sorry, I just can’t wait until the end of class to hug you.” She came to me and embraced me with the warmest, most loving hug I’ve received since Kat. Then class continued with my usual flubbery.

After class, in the hallway, Jamie and I talked, catching up, for about a half hour. She bragged about me to other bystanders. “Jenn, religiously came to my 9 am pointe classes. She helped me get it up and running. Not many people thought a 9 am hour and a half pointe class was possible.” She laughed. It was, hands down, the best pointe class in the city. I held back a tear knowing that I will probably never dance on pointe again.

The next class had begun. I looked in. Holy shit. Sascha Radetsky was teaching. At Broadway Dance Center. We made eye contact through the window. He cocked his head and smirked at me with the curiosity of a vague memory of someone from many many years ago. He kept demonstrating without missing a beat.

As you can probably imagine, going the class added much needed grounding comfort to another exasperating trip. I spent a total of just over two hours in the building, yet that precious time is the reason why I keep trying to fight this CRPS battle. Dancers are my people. Ballet is my home.

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